Using shelf prompts alone, shoppers were four times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. Using shelf prompts and feedback, shoppers were eight times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. This experiment highlighted how an understanding of human behaviour and a simple intervention can make a positive difference for communities.     Team Members: Anna Barham, Hadleigh Bodle, Lindon Keith, Heidi Sharples, and Olivia Tuck.

Designing an Intervention to Encourage Donations

I conducted this experiment in applied behavioural psychology to test whether prompts suggesting shoppers donate items to a foodbank bin would make a significant difference to the number of donations. I also wanted to check what effect feedback would have, so in a second supermarket, a large poster with a line graph was introduced in addition to the small prompts, to let shoppers easily see how many items had been donated each day.

 Using shelf prompts alone, shoppers were four times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. Using shelf prompts and feedback, shoppers were eight times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. This experiment highlighted how an understanding of human behaviour and a simple intervention can make a positive difference for communities.     Team Members: Anna Barham, Hadleigh Bodle, Lindon Keith, Heidi Sharples, and Olivia Tuck.

Using shelf prompts alone, shoppers were four times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. Using shelf prompts and feedback, shoppers were eight times more likely than usual to donate items to the foodbank bin. This experiment highlighted how an understanding of human behaviour and a simple intervention can make a positive difference for communities.

 

Team Members: Anna Barham, Hadleigh Bodle, Lindon Keith, Heidi Sharples, and Olivia Tuck.